Augmented Reality: Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller

Following is an exceptional example of an artist using augmented reality. Known primarily for their sound installations, Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller (Cardiff and Miller) were commissioned by dOCUMENTA (13) to create this AR video. Artist description:

The Alter Bahnhof Video Walk was designed for the old train station in Kassel, Germany as part of dOCUMENTA (13). Participants are able to borrow an iPod and headphones from a check-out booth. They are then directed by Cardiff and Miller through the station. An alternate world opens up where reality and fiction meld in a disturbing and uncanny way that has been referred to as "physical cinema". The participants watch things unfold on the small screen but feel the presence of those events deeply because of being situated in the exact location where the footage was shot. As they follow the moving images (and try to frame them as if they were the camera operator) a strange confusion of realities occurs. In this confusion, the past and present conflate and Cardiff and Miller guide us through a meditation on memory and reveal the poignant moments of being alive and present.

 
 

Another of their installations, The Forty Part Motet (a reworking of Spem in Alium by Thomas Tallis, 1573), investigates sound as sculpture in physical and virtual space. This work is on viewat the Metropolitan Museum of Art Cloisers through December 8th, 2013.

Artist statement:

"While listening to a concert you are normally seated in front of the choir, in traditional audience position. With this piece I want the audience to be able to experience a piece of music from the viewpoint of the singers. Every performer hears a unique mix of the piece of music. Enabling the audience to move throughout the space allows them to be intimately connected with the voices. It also reveals the piece of music as a changing construct. As well I am interested in how sound may physically construct a space in a sculptural way and how a viewer may choose a path through this physical yet virtual space.

I placed the speakers around the room in an oval so that the listener would be able to really feel the sculptural construction of the piece by Tallis. You can hear the sound move from one choir to another, jumping back and forth, echoing each other and then experience the overwhelming feeling as the sound waves hit you when all of the singers are singing.”

Forty separately recorded voices are played back through forty speakers strategically placed throughout the space.